I’m In On This Trend, Kokedama

Kokedama is the Japanese art of string gardens with the roots wrapped in a soil mixture and moss.

I have been working my way through a tray of little plants, removing most of the potting soil and replacing with a mixture of Akedama soil and peat moss.

After forming a nice ball of soil around the roots, I wrap the entire root ball with wet sheet moss.

Waxed string is used to bind the entire moss and soil ball.  Tightly but not too tightly.

Tie on additional string to form a hanger for you string garden.

Water when it feels light by soaking in a vase of water for 5 min.

Then hang in a pretty spot!

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I Wonder If They Are Hiring?

On a recent vacation to Playa de carmen, Mexico, we spent a day at the natural aquarium Xel-ha’.   Xel-ha’ was named by the ancient Maya and translates to “where the water is born”  This stunning tropical world offered a day of snorkeling, beaches, great food, drinks and warm sunshine.

I wandered around the nursery that is home to an amazing variety of native plants; more then 270 species.  The plants are raised to maintain the conservation of the reserve, as well as ensure the safety of many endangered species of plants.

I could have put on garden gloves and some garden shoes  and stayed all day!

 

 

 

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Patiently Waiting

While the gardeners in warmer climates are busy getting their gardens underway, we must wait patiently in the colder growing zones.

I found myself kicking at the last stubborn snow piles around the kitchen garden this morning.

Mother Nature is bringing rain with possible thunderstorms this evening…that should erase the last evidence of winter-for now!

March is a month of high snowfall amounts, so I’m sure the white will blanket the garden a bit more before spring, or even well into spring!

 

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Behind The Scenes

I recently visited Xel Ha, a natural ecological aquarium and tropical lagoon.

Located on the Caribbean Coast of the state of Quintana Roo, Mexico.

Xel Ha means ‘birthplace of water’ and we snorkeled and  explored cenotes, caves, and lagoons fed by the ocean.

The day and experience left us in tired and in awe of the sights and beauty of this part of our world.

The end of the day finished with a stop at the plant nursery that supports their mission as an ecological park.

I look forward to sharing more of this special place that included an Apiary that houses melipona Bees, that are stingless.

 

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