The Situation

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Little critters moved into the greenhouse this winter.

Despite several attempts at location and eviction notices,

I couldn’t get more then a glimpse of the squatters.

Yes, I ran from the greenhouse with a few small screams, more then once!

Several times I brought in reinforcements.

My cats just lounged and cleaned their paws.

Last Saturday, the sun warmed to near 50 degrees and I announced it was ‘the day’,

I was going to find that mouse!

I bravely–stood on the little stool and poked at everything with a garden hoe.

Nothing moved, nothing scurried, no mouse.

Until I opened my toolbox!

How dare they–yes, they–take up residence in my toolbox!

Waiting for the next warm day to decontaminate EVERYTHING.

Who Can’t Wait?

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The snow has melted enough to uncover grass and ground.

The edges of the raised beds are visible after months of snow cover.

I’m born and raised in Minnesota, so I do know that winter is far from over.

That doesn’t stop me from enjoying the few days,

that the melting sunshine brings the hint of spring to the garden.

27 days to spring!

Breaking Bud

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Winter days can become long.

This gardener loves her leafy greens!

Branches from flowering shrubs are easy to force indoors, and provide that winter color.

  1. Gather your branches.  Select healthy, young branches with plenty of buds.
  2. Practice good pruning technique by cutting the branches about 1/4 ” above a side bud or branch.
  3. Cut the stems again and place in cool water; no higher then 3″ high on the stems.  Place the branches in a cool location out of the sun.
  4. When the buds began to show, place in decorative vases and a sunny location.
  5. Change water frequently or add a floral preservative to the water.
  6. If you branches develop roots, the branches can be trimmed to 6″ and potted individually.  Keep moist until permanent roots form.  Move outdoors when the warm weather returns.

Try Honeysuckle, Forsythia, Flowering Almond, Wisteria, Lilac, Pussy Willow,

Privet, Dogwood, Rhododendron.

Planning

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A Gardener is always planning.

Which varieties will I grow?

When should I start seeds?

These tasks help me through the winter months.

The soil rests but my mind is busy.

A new notebook is ready for my gardening ideas and plans.

Some changes are coming to the blog this year,

I will continue to share images and gardening tidbits,

but adding some project ideas that I hope you will find interesting.

Stop by next year!