Great Balls Of Fire

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Now this is my kind of Autumn weather!

I was able to spend an entire day out in the garden, trying to clean up spent perennials and even got a few bulbs planted.  Sunshine has been very scarce and I had felt my mood began to darken along with the weather.  The Burning Bush is like a big cup of coffee for my soul!

 

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Tiger Eye Sumac

As we enter autumn in the garden, the Tiger Eye Sumac foliage becomes the  star.

I would so love to grow a Japanese Maple, but sadly it would not survive a zone 4 winter.

The Tiger Eye gives me an interesting shape in the garden and the burst of bright color at the end of the season.

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A Dovecote- DIY

Dovecotes have a fascinating history dating all the way back to Roman days. Though many have disappeared over the years, during the 17th Century England had over 26,000 dovecotes on the grounds of monasteries and manor houses. Doves at that time were considered a food source, for both the eggs and the birds themselves.

My interest in having a Dovecote in the garden came from years of reading garden books that often focused on beautiful Cottage Gardens in the South of France.  I loved the gardens often featured in the magazine Victoria.  Dovecotes were often a focal point featured in charming flower filled gardens.

Generally working on a budget and from materials that I have around here, I fashioned a farmhouse Dovecote with clay pots for the potting shed.

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You will need:

10 -4 inch clay pots

10 washers with small holes and 10 screws.

Starting at the top; center the first pot and place a washer and screw through the drainage hole in the pot. Screw securely into the siding but avoid over tightening, as this can crack the pot.

Continue adding pots making sure they are just touching each other.

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Wait for your Doves or feathered friends to find their stylish new nesting place!

I’m still waiting!

 

 

 

The Garden Anchors

The lesson I have throughly learnt,

and wish to pass on to others,

is to know the enduring happiness

that the love of a garden gives.

Gertrude Jekyll

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Two days of sunshine and warm temperatures helped me make progress on the painting and staining of the greenhouse and Rabbit Run Cottage-potting shed.

So much more to do and finish, but waiting for spring to return.  It’s hard to paint in a winter coat and gloves!

I’m happy with the changes and can’t wait for the plants and flowers to fill in the canvas.

 

 

Must Be Allergies

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I’m itching to get into the garden.

It will be weeks before plants and seeds can be dropped into the raised beds,

but getting the beds ready with new compost and some new mulch around the kitchen garden can happen just as soon as it stops snowing!

The greenhouse needs new paint and some repairs this spring,

Rabbit Run Cottage is changing it’s colors this year,

and the empty chicken coop is going to undergo some changes.

I am opening up the little garden to a few Garden Club tours this summer,

so the pressure is on!

Complaint Department Response

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Mother Nature responds with sunshine, calm and a promise of nearly 70 degrees!

Rolling up my sleeves for a day of work.

This trellis needs work from some winter damage.

The list goes on from there!